Journal of Advances in Microbiology Research
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P-ISSN: 2709-9431, E-ISSN: 2709-944X

Journal of Advances in Microbiology Research


2022, Vol. 3, Issue 2, Part A
Lymphocytic choriomeningitis: An emerging and re-emerging rodent-borne viral zoonotic disease


Author(s): Mahendra Pal, Kirubel Paulos Gutama, Sujatha Singh, Dimitri Ketchakmadze and Nino Durglishvili

Abstract: Lymphocytic choriomeningitis is an infectious emerging and re-emerging of zoonosis of public health significance that is caused by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus that belongs to the Arenaviridae family and is an important cause of neurological disease in humans. The common house mouse, Mus musculus, is the natural host for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The infected rats and mice shed huge amounts of the virus in their saliva, urine, feces, and nasal secretions. When feces, saliva, or urine from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infected rodents is inhaled or swallowed, acquired primary infection ensues. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus can infect the fetus after crossing the placenta. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in humans is usually asymptomatic, although it can cause aseptic meningitis or, in rare cases, meningoencephalitis. The infection due to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus can be severe and most often fatal among transplant patients. IgM and IgG antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum are frequently used to make a laboratory diagnosis. Virus can be found in the cerebrospinal fluid during the acute stage of disease using PCR or virus isolation technique. Because there is no cure for the disease, treatment is symptomatic and supportive. Limiting the entry of wild mice into facilities, wearing protective clothes, and taking caution while handling affected animals or tissues, as well as basic hygiene measures, can all help to prevent this rodent borne viral disease?

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How to cite this article:
Mahendra Pal, Kirubel Paulos Gutama, Sujatha Singh, Dimitri Ketchakmadze, Nino Durglishvili. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis: An emerging and re-emerging rodent-borne viral zoonotic disease. J Adv Microbiol Res 2022;3(2):01-04.
Journal of Advances in Microbiology Research